Editorial: “The Evolution of Data Literacy Education at Florida State University Libraries”


We are excited to announce a new editorial today by Nick Ruhs of Florida State University. The editorial is titled “The Evolution of Data Literacy Education at Florida State University Libraries,” and it describes the growth of data literacy instruction at the author’s institution from “a handful of one-shot workshops focused on research data management” to “a mature series of multi-disciplinary training opportunities focused on data analysis and visualization software.” Read the editorial here.

Editorial: “The Pokémon has Four Arms: Research Data Management Education through Popular Culture”

We are excited to announce a new editorial today by Hannah Gunderman of Carnegie Mellon University. The editorial is titled “The Pokémon has Four Arms: Research Data Management Education through Popular Culture,” and it provides a case study describing a fun and engaging approach to teaching research data management by “using Pokémon to teach how to write detailed, reproducible documentation for research data in a project.” Read the editorial here.

Editorial: “Historical Analog Data: Valuable Asset at Risk on Your Campus”


We are excited to announce a new editorial today by Lois G. Hendrickson, Kristen L. Mastel, Shannon L. Farrell, and Julia A. Kelly of the University of Minnesota Libraries – Twin Cities. Their editorial is titled “Historical Analog Data: Valuable Asset at Risk on Your Campus,” and it discusses their work and lessons learned from helping researchers with analog data as well as a survey of the research literature where scientists used analog data. Read the editorial here.

Editorial: “Quantitative Data Skills for Undergraduates: Training Social Science Students to Work with Data”

We are excited to announce a new editorial today by Amelia Kallaher and Whitney Kramer of Cornell University. Their editorial is titled “Quantitative Data Skills for Undergraduates: Training Social Science Students to Work with Data,” and it describes the development and assessment of “a virtual seminar for undergraduates consisting of six 60-minute data-focused sessions with an accompanying Canvas course” that they developed to address a gap they identified in training for undergraduates on how to find existing data for projects. Read the editorial here.