Call for Editorial Proposals: Due October 30th

The ResearchDataQ Editorial Board is seeking proposals for editorials that describe services, support, or related activities around research data at your institution. Check out our past editorials for examples!

Proposals (up to 250 words) should clearly describe:

1. The services, support, or related activities you intend to address;

2. How you implemented this and/or what would be required to implement it elsewhere;

3. How this relates to relevant existing recommendations, policies, or standards (if applicable).

Please submit proposals here by October 30, 2020: https://goo.gl/forms/oxqIaoQ3tlGmfhil2.

We expect to notify authors of accepted proposals in mid-November, and we will ask authors to expand accepted proposal topics into approximately 1000-1500 word editorials (ideally by the end of December with the possibility to extend if needed). The editorials will be featured on the ResearchDataQ website.

Monthly Data Resources: September 2020

Every month, the ResearchDataQ editorial board will collect and share info on data-related events, publications, and other resources that may be of interest to the community.

Have an appropriate item to share in a future Data Resources post? Submit your suggestions via our Suggest a Topic form.

Upcoming Events:

Visualizing the Future Live Update, Tuesday, September 22, 1pm to 2pm Eastern time | 10am to 11am Pacific time | 5pm to 6pm UTC time, Registration Form

Visualizing the Future is an IMLS National Forum Grant to develop a literacy-based instructional and research agenda for library and information professionals with the aim to create a community of praxis focused on data visualization. Tune in to learn about grant activities and upcoming community-building opportunities.

Recent Publications:

Catherine D’Ignazio and Lauren Klein, Data Feminism (MIT Press, 2020), now open access: https://data-feminism.mitpress.mit.edu/

Linnet Taylor, Gargi Sharma, Aaron Martin, and Shazade Jameson, eds., Data Justice and COVID-19: Global Perspectives; info: https://shop.meatspacepress.com/product/data-justice-and-covid-19-global-perspectives ; open access PDF via the Internet Archive: https://ia801905.us.archive.org/23/items/data-justice-and-covid-19/Data_Justice_and_COVID-19.pdf

Kayla Abner, “Data Literacy as Digital Humanities Literacy: Exploration of Threshold Concepts,” dh+lib special issue, 22 June 2020.

Other Resources:

Shanda Hunt, “Data Visualization Services Toolkit for Libraries” (“…intended for librarians and libraries embarking on a new data visualization service, but could also be used to refresh skills, develop lesson plans for a data visualization course, or as a starter for anyone with an interest in the topic.”)

Mine Çetinkaya-Rundel, “Data Science in a Box” (an intro to data science for learners without background in stats or computing, with interactive tutorials using R)

Data Curation Network, “Data Curation Primers” (new additions include data curation primers for Twitter, GeoTIFF, ISO Images, and Neuroimaging DICOM and NIfTI)

National Institutes of Health, “All of Us Research Hub” (portal to biomedical data and metadata; currently in beta testing)

Editorial: “Generating Interdisciplinary Dialogue: A Book Discussion to Consider the Place of Data Visualization in the Classroom”

We are excited to announce a new editorial today by Shannon Sheridan and Rick Fisher of the University of Wyoming. Their editorial is titled “Generating Interdisciplinary Dialogue: A Book Discussion to Consider the Place of Data Visualization in the Classroom,” and it discusses a collaboration between the University of Wyoming’s Data Management Librarian and Director of Communication across the Curriculum (CxC) to use a book discussion group on data visualization “to challenge and extend faculty’s views about what counts as academic and disciplinary ‘communication,’ a concept that is often quite narrowly defined in classroom settings.” Read the editorial here.

DEADLINE EXTENDED! Call for Proposals: Spring 2020

The ResearchDataQ Editorial Board (part of the ACRL Digital Scholarship Section) is seeking proposals for editorials that will be featured prominently on the ResearchDataQ website. We are seeking editorials that describe services, support, and related activities around research data at your institution.

Proposals should clearly describe:

  1. The service, support, or activity you intend to address;
  2. How you implemented it and/or what would be required to implement it elsewhere;
  3. How it relates to any relevant existing recommendations, policies, or standards.

Please submit proposals by March 15, 2020 using this form. We expect to notify authors of accepted proposals in early April, and we will ask authors to expand accepted proposal topics into approximately 1000-1500 word editorials by the end of May. The editorials will be featured on the ResearchDataQ website.

Read recent editorials here: https://researchdataq.org

If you have any questions, please contact Clara Llebot Lorente at Clara DOT Llebot AT oregonstate DOT edu.

Sincerely,

The ResearchDataQ Editorial Board
Andrew Johnson (Convener)
David Durden
Vessela Ensberg
Lynda Kellam
Clara Llebot Lorente
Wendy Mann
Jamie Wittenberg

Call for Proposals: Spring 2020 Editorials

The ResearchDataQ Editorial Board is accepting proposals for editorials to be published on the ResearchDataQ website. Editorials should address best practices for approaches to supporting research data in academic libraries.

Proposals should include:

  1. The best practice you intend to address;
  2. How you implemented it at your library and/or what would be required to implement it elsewhere;
  3. How it relates to any relevant existing recommendations, policies, or standards.

Please submit proposals via this form by February 7, 2020. Authors will be notified of accepted proposals in early March, and we will ask authors to expand accepted proposal topics into approximately 2000 word editorials by the end of April.

If you have any questions, please contact Clara Llebot Lorente (Clara DOT Llebot AT oregonstate DOT edu).

Sincerely,

The ResearchDataQ Editorial Board
Andrew Johnson (Convener)
David Durden
Vessela Ensberg
Lynda Kellam
Clara Llebot Lorente
Wendy Mann
Jamie Wittenberg

Editorial: “Give Them What They Want: Graduate Student Workshops Focused on Skills, Not Theory”

The fifth and final post for 2019 in our editorial series, by Clara Llebot Lorente and Hannah Rempel of Oregon State University, shares lessons learned about tailoring workshops for graduate students to skills rather than theory. The authors “learned that offering content that is initially abstract, but which is based in practice better aligns with our audience’s learning preferences and results in more successful workshops for both attendees and librarians.” They provide best practices for designing library workshops based on their experiences and registration data, including specific recommendations for data management-focused workshops. Read the editorial here.

Editorial: “Radical Collaboration: Making the Computational Turn in Special Collections and Archives”

We are excited to announce that the third post in our series of editorials has been published. This editorial, by Justin D. Shanks, Sara Mannheimer, and Jason Clark of Montana State University, presents a case study of “radical collaboration” at their institution. They discuss the process of bringing together library employees working in data, digital scholarship, archives, and special collections so that “new ideas can be incubated and library and archives projects can be strengthened in a unified, co-located, cross-domain environment.” The editorial includes “thoughts regarding the potential of radical collaboration and the future of academic libraries, research data, and digital scholarship.” Read the editorial here.

Editorial: “What About the Little Guys?: How to Approach Supporting Research Data Management at a Small Liberal Arts College”

We are excited to announce that the second post in our series of editorials has been published. This editorial, by Rachel Walton and Patti McCall-Wright of Rollins College, explores issues with research data management support at a small liberal arts college. The authors challenge the narrative “that real research and datasets are not components of a liberal arts college”, and share what they learned from documenting and examining the many “data stories” they heard from people at their institution. Read the editorial here.

First editorial published: “The Boilerplate Problem in Data Management Plans”

We are very excited to announce that we have published the first of five editorials we received in response to our open call for proposals last spring. The first editorial, authored by Spencer D. C. Keralis, Elizabeth Grumbach, and Sarah Potvin, describes their “discovery of the prevalence of boilerplate language describing institutional repositories or digital libraries infrastructure and metadata schemas” from their research examining successful grant proposals from the National Endowment for the Humanities Office of Digital Humanities (NEH-ODH). Read the editorial here.